Tuesday, July 31, 2012

Typhoid Vaccination - What you should know...

Typhoid Fever Vaccination

Many of us have not heard about Typhoid Fever, and not many know about the vaccinations available. Typhoid vaccination is currently compulsory for all Food and Beverages (F&B) handlers under the Malaysian Food Act 1983 and Food Hygiene Regulation 2009. Typhoid vaccination should be also considered for those traveling to countries where typhoid (Salmonella typhi) is common.

What is typhoid fever?

Typhoid fever is a life-threatening illness caused by bacteria called Salmonella Typhi.  It causes high fever, fatigue, weakness, stomach pains, headache, loss of appetite, and sometimes rashes. If it is not treated, about 30% of people who get it might die. Some people who get typhoid become “carriers,” who can spread the disease to others. Generally, people get typhoid from contaminated food or water. Therefore, it is important that we make sure that people who are handling our food are not carriers.

Typhoid strikes about 21 million people a year around the world and kills about 200,000. Some people who get the disease get it while traveling. If you are traveling to a country where typhoid is common, you should consider being vaccinated against typhoid. Visit our Clique Clinic to discuss your vaccination options.
Remember that you will need to complete your vaccination at least 1 week before you travel so that the vaccine has time to take effect. Typhoid vaccines lose effectiveness after several years (normally 2-3 years); if you were vaccinated in the past, check with our doctor to see if it is time for a booster vaccination.

You can get typhoid fever if you eat food or drink beverages that have been handled by a person who is shedding Salmonella Typhi or if sewage contaminated with Salmonella Typhi bacteria gets into the water you use for drinking or washing food. Therefore, typhoid fever is more common in areas of the world where hand-washing is less frequent and water is likely to be contaminated with sewage. 


Once Salmonella Typhi bacteria are eaten or drunk, they multiply and spread into the bloodstream. The body reacts with fever and other signs and symptoms. You can get typhoid fever if you eat food or drink beverages that have been handled by a person who is shedding Salmonella Typhi or if sewage contaminated with Salmonella Typhi bacteria gets into the water you use for drinking or washing food. Therefore, typhoid fever is more common in areas of the world where hand-washing is less frequent and water is likely to be contaminated with sewage. 



How is typhoid fever spread?

Salmonella Typhi lives only in humans. Persons with typhoid fever carry the bacteria in their bloodstream and intestinal tract. In addition, a small number of persons, called carriers, recover from typhoid fever but continue to carry the bacteria. Both ill persons and carriers shed Salmonella Typhi in their feces (stool). 

How can you avoid typhoid fever?

Two basic actions can protect you from typhoid fever: Avoid risky foods and drinks.Get vaccinated against typhoid fever.It may surprise you, but watching what you eat and drink when you travel is as important as being vaccinated. This is because the vaccines are not completely effective. Avoiding risky foods will also help protect you from other illnesses, including travelers' diarrhea, cholera, dysentery, and hepatitis A.
Who should get typhoid vaccine?

Routine typhoid vaccination is recommended for food handlers in Malaysia. It is important to vaccinate all F&B outlet staffs and household maids. Others include: 
  • Travelers to parts of the world where typhoid iscommon. (NOTE: typhoid vaccine is not 100% effective and is not a substitute for being careful about what you eat or drink).
  • People in close contact with a typhoid carrier.
  • Laboratory workers who work with Salmonella Typhi bacteria.

Typhoid Vaccines


There are two vaccines to prevent typhoid. One is an inactivated (killed) vaccine given as a shot, and the other is a live, attenuated (weakened) vaccine which is taken orally (by mouth).

In Clique Clinic, we offer typhoid Typhim Vi®, Typhoid Vi Polysaccharide Vaccine, produced by Sanofi Pasteur SA. It is a sterile solution containing the cell surface Vi polysaccharide extracted from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, S typhi Ty2 strain.

What are the risks from typhoid vaccine?

Like any medicine, a vaccine could cause a serious problem, such as a severe allergic reaction.  The risk of typhoid vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small. Serious problems from typhoid vaccine are very rare.
•           Fever (up to about 1 person in 100)
•           Headache (up to about 1 person in 30)
                      Redness or swelling at the site of the injection (up to about 1 person in 15)

Who should not get the vaccine?

                      Should not be given to children younger than 2 years of age.
                      Anyone who has had a severe reaction to a previous dose of this vaccine should not get another dose.
                      Anyone who has a severe allergy to any component of this vaccine should not get it. Tell your doctor  if you have any severe allergies.
                      Anyone who is moderately or severely ill at the time the shot is scheduled should usually wait until they recover before getting the vaccine.

For more information about our typhoid vaccinations, please contact +603-79601211 or write to us at care@cliqueclinic.com.

3 comments:

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  2. how typhoid fever can happen? after we receive a vaccine or before we receive?

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    1. If you do not receive typhoid vaccination, chances of contracting typhoid fever is higher. As any other bacterial fever it can be treated with proper antibiotic. The concern about typhoid fever is that the organism can remain in your body although you are not having fever, this person is known as a typhoid carrier. These carriers can spread the disease to other people unknowingly.

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